Without Dad

I’M TAKING HIS ’52 BUICK AND FLY ROD FISHING

Steve tells me that the fishing has been great in Yellowstone. I’m going to spend two days fishing. I only know how to tie one fly, and it’s kind of messy. But it catches fish. It’s called a ’52 Buick. 52-buick.jpgIt looks like a lot of the nymphs used around here, and I have a bunch of them.

My new camera is on the fritz again – operator error. So I searched the web for a picture of the ’52 Buick. The only one that looks like the one that Dad tied is from British Columbia.

I found it at “THE FLYSHOP” site. It’s a place where they make custom fly rods and flies. There are some other sites that have flies that look similar, (STS Guiding Service in British Columbia, and Washington State University TV, they have a page showing all the flies on the Open Media Network (OMN) – it’s kind of interesting.

nations sedgeI’m also taking some of John’s Old Flies they worked in the early Spring and he says they work everywhere. I don’t know if they have a name, so I just call them John’s Old Flies. He did say that they are the Nation’s Sedge, whatever that means.

I went to the fly shop to buy some flies so I could see what the real ones looked like. When I asked for a ’52 Buick they all giggled at the silly girl. Of course they never heard of the fly so it didn’t exist. It’s funny how a “professional” in the fly fishing industry deals with women. Silly ego’s and new-found expertise greeted me from the pimply faced youths that arrived here three weeks ago. They spoke gibberish, tried to sell me other flies, and failed to hear what I was saying. I’m not going back to that shop: there’s plenty to choose from here.

Now, I’m not an expert fly fishing person. But I’ve spent more time on the rivers that they were telling me all about – and they’d never even seen them. I pity the tourists that come here and expect to get some good information. Folklore at best – third hand! Bah, Humbug.

bead head prince

I’m also taking some of my favorite bead head nymphs because they look so cute and work real good. I’m going to try to catch some fish on the dry flies that everybody around here uses.

The guys at the bar gave me some Elk Hair Caddis and some Trico Spinners. The caddis are good because they float for a long time. elk-hair-caddis.jpgThe trico flies are used for the little bugs – they said it didn’t much matter what kind they were, just that little-trico.jpgthey were about the right size – these are real small; hook size 18 and 20.

My fly box is full of the flies that I’ve collected from California. They don’t look much like the flies around here. Here the fish seem to prefer very small flies. I guess it’s a matter of how long the winter lasts. The only big flies are the stone fly types, and some of them are giant. I guess if you’re a trout it’s feast or famine. So, I’m getting a box for just Yellowstone flies.

Dad’s rods are bamboo, (I have a few of them,) but this was his favorite. I use it most of the time. It’s an eight weight and they tell me it’s too heavy for the fishing around here – works fine. It doesn’t have many chips in it and the colors of the bmbooo.jpgsilk thread are just beautiful. It’s turning dark orange and Steve says that it ought to be refinished. I’ll probably just get me a new one when this one wears out.

Well, I slept in this morning, called mom and made a few other phone dad-00.jpgcalls, and sat at the computer for a while.

Dad would be proud that I got dressed first thing. I’m going to run a bit, have a late – late lunch and then go to the park for this evening’s fishing. The weather has been very gentle for this time of year. The rains and thundershowers have not materialized like they ought to and the drought is getting worse. The rivers look low, even to me, and I’ve only been here for about a year.

Dad always said that low water was the hardest to fish; the folks around here don’t seem to think so – I’ll find out: with Dad’s ’52 Buick and bamboo rod.

A Few Quick Takes

I’M OVERWHELMED BY NEWS

dry-fly.jpgAs an anxiety killer, dry fly fishing ranks near the top. It’s fishing that requires Zen-like concentration tightly focussed upon threading a nearly invisible pin hole atop a hook deftly dressed as a fly, with a nearly transparent line and tying a minute but secure knot in it. The other portion of your time is spent a) getting into your ridiculous-looking gear b) casting as far and gently as possible to land your lure gently upon the water and then c) watching the river for an encouraging ripple signifying the presence of trout that are within your view but seemingly always out of reach.MAMACITA

polar.jpg‘I don’t want to live in permafrost no more.’Gristmill

Changes to agricultural practice and forestry management could cut greenhouse gas emissions, buying time to develop alternative technologies.Scientific American

Eye candy that’s melting fast.Gristmill

grizzly-muddler.jpg— There are a number of ungulate hairs suited to spun and clipped patterns but the best spinning hairs are coarse, spongy and soft. – Philip Rowley

Non-indigenous fish, introduced in the 18th century are taking over South African rivers and streams.Get Outdoors

palomarknot.gifThe Palomar Knot is a general-purpose fishing knot . . .Women Fishing

— By the End of the Century Half of All Species Will Be Gone. Who Will Survive? – RedOrbit

But a good barbera is the epitome of an elemental, honest red wine. It offers you fruit — lots of spicy cherry and raspberry flavors — and it doesn’t hurl w-vs-beer.jpgthem at you in some formless mass. Barbera is shaped by a bracing acidity. It’s got a bite, a burr, that makes the fruit incisive and refreshing.Eric Asimov / New York Times

. . . a Gallup poll revealed that, for the first time ever, Americans preferred wine to beer. This was an astonishing development, akin to Americans jilting baseball for bocce.Slate

================

The Brucellocis/Bison/Cattle Industry/Yellowstone/Montana PROBLEM continues to make news on many fronts, (go to Yellowstone Newspaper for the stories – both the lewd and the lucid.) One element that has not been addressed is the fact that as the planet warms and Yellowstone becomes a bit more bison-friendly environment; the population of these habituated beasties will grow to the point of destruction. whine.gifIf all the bison that have been killed in the last five years had been allowed to mature and reproduce there would be no grass left in the park.

The whiners have tamed Yellowstone and provided us with wolves that peer into car windows, bears that approach humans, coyotes that beg for food, and bison that proliferate without predation. The bison situation is far larger that the slaughter of a few poor babies. It is the problem of a sentiment gone rampant. Don’t dare ask the cheerleaders what would happen to the park if bison were left to their own protected devices.

Where are the whiners at Wind Cave National Park? Did you know that bison management has worked there and that roundups and culling continue? Did you know that there are some sane managers in the NPS?

 

“The park holds a roundup annually to monitor the health of the herd and to manage herd size for available forage,” said Superintendent Linda L. Stoll.

The wolves have done wonders with some of the elk herd – where’s the “TRADITIONAL” bison predators? Where is the sane management? Ahhh, I get it: publicity, not a care for the park.

water-buffalo.jpg

Fishing On Opening Day

THERE’S SO MUCH MORE THAN FISH

another-bison-jam.jpgI went fishing on Saturday. Went up to the Firehole and fished in Biscuit Basin – just like about 300 other people. It was fun and it was sunny and it was just like a picnic.

There were buffalo and elk and tourists and fishermen and rangers and smog and honking horns and tour buses and all of the good things that make Memorial Day Weekend such a joy in Yellowstone.

I talked to some women who felt that the crowds detracted from their experience, but they went along because their husband’s just wouldn’t miss the chance to be first on the river.

I suppose that’s important. I was about number 200. I caught some fish and I enjoyed the beautiful weather. The temperature was just perfect if you found the right patch of shade.

A nice fisherman in pretty blue waders told me that the Blue Wing Olives and March Browns were hatching and that I needed to use his special fly. I asked him what it was and he said it was a Midge imitation that he invented himself. It was so small that I had trouble getting it on the tippet.

prince.jpgI didn’t catch any fish with it. It didn’t float too well. I did catch a real nice trout on a Prince Nymph that was about 1/2 inch long – size eight or ten; I’m not real good at this yet. I found a neat web page that is written by a local kid that has good information about the Firehole River. It’s called “Firehole River” at Yellowstone National Park.com.

baby-trout.jpgThe baby trout were very hungry and I caught a bunch of them. After a bit, I went to the car to get my camera so I could take a picture. What a jinx that was. But I did get a nice baby trout picture of a fish caught by a fisherman from Utah.

I’m going to wait until the end of the week before I go back. There are just too many cars, and the kid at the fly shop said that we should have a slow week starting about Friday.

===============

griz.jpgThere’s been a lot of talk about the “grizzly bear expert” that was mauled by mom while defending her cub. And gee, he was only three miles from the road and alone and in the Springtime, and in bear country, and he’d been mauled before – a genuine expert at getting mauled!

There’s an article that I wish I’d written: An Open Letter To Jim Cole, Grizzly Expert. (Once He Gets Out Of The Hospital.)

PHANTASTIC PHOTO

OH HOW I WISH I COULD DO THIS !

This is, to my eye, absolutely beautiful. It was taken by Nick Tansley, and the reproduction here does not do it justice. Click on over to TREK EARTH and see how lovely it is. The technical data is a story in itself. Thank you Nick.

.gone-fishing.jpg.

I Found A Fly – No, Two!

BLESSED ESCAPE
flying-sled.jpg

The West Yellowstone sled show took over town last weekend and I left our village. They call it EXPO.

I went up to Big Sky, and then tried some fishing. (Funny thing, we go “UP” to Big Sky and “Down” to Bozeman – same road, same direction, and both are lower than West Yellowstone ???) I’m rusty, and I scared most of the fish. But I did find a fly that works. Actually found two flies that work.

shallow-trout.jpgMy friends in Big Sky fish and ski. Or, they ski and fish. One of them, John, tied me some flies that are from a very old pattern. He said it works everywhere. Well it works on the Madison River by Hebgen Dam, and it works on the Gallatin River by the willows at the end of the road, anyway. The other is a novelty fly that wobbles. The wobbler is hard to cast and got caught in the willows.

fly-gif.gifThe wobbler works to scare fish, the old fly works to catch fish. I guess that’s fair. John found a picture of the wobbler on a web site that sells them – I’m not using it any more. The old fly is pretty easy to tie, and it’s going to be the first fly I practice on when I get the time, (if I get the time.)

Boy there are a lot of fly fishing sites on the web. I spent some time with John looking at many kinds of sites, and different things. There are a lot of blogs, and retail has expanded all over the place. One site that we looked at was “Tour Canada – a clean, spacious, scenic, fun place to visit!” It opens with a few loud bars from “Oh Canada.” They had a good picture of the old fly that John showed me. It’s hard to find so click on this LINK to get right to it.

I used the old fly, it’s kind of big, a size 6. Sunday I went to the river by Campfire Lodge and fished right by the restaurant. It’s not open yet but there were some nice folks from town, (also avoiding the snowmobiles,) and they showed me where to cast. I caught a little fish, about as big as the handle on my rod. And, I caught a big fish, about as big as the handle and the reel. It was a sunny day and there was not a breath of wind. The water is just about as cold as the snow. I fished from the bank and my feet got cold. I guess it’s about time for the fish to spawn, and staying out of the water avoids smashing the eggs.

nations-sedge.jpgI’ve got run now; the streets are almost all clear of snow and it’s a warm 36 degrees. I’m going to take a ride on my new bicycle. The west entrance of the park is open to bicycles, and it’s a good way to get to the instruments. Oh, Here’s a picture of the fly that works to catch fish – not scare them..

How I Got Sucked Into The Monitor

IT WAS A BLISSFUL JOURNEY

After a brief and cold jog around town, and after a hearty breakfast I plopped in front of the computer and promised myself that the draft summary report would be completed by this evening.

Ahhhh the best laid . . . just a quick look at my Bloglines page, a couple of innocent clicks, BAM! What a site!

thundercloud-by-graham-owens.jpgGO SOLAR – the home page hints at little that is most fascinating at this location. In fact there is no mention of the beauty on the page. Stealth led me to some photographs. For me, the fascination was first awakened on that page: a beautiful thunderhead cloud viewed from the air.

macro-of-orange-firefly-by-graham-owen.jpgThen, there it was, the most amazing photos of flies: real, faux, decorative, artistic, and flying, and battling, and I was hooked. If you are at all interested in fantastic creativity visit the Photography and Fly pages of Graham Owen. {CLICK ON THE PHOTOS – IT’S WORTH IT!}

orange-dragonflies-interacting-2-by-graham-owens.jpgSome of the flies fool flies. An epic battle is illustrated between dragonflies. The faux fly, just anchored to the twig, is mercilessly pounded by the soaring bug, — I was sucked in.

9-three-flies-by-graham-owen.jpgThe real dragonfly even attacked a faux fly to remove an imitation fly for food – survival of the most aggressive. I was sucked even deeper into the monitor.

a-21-brookie-by-graham-owen.jpgThen I discovered my favorite picture, a 21″ Brook Trout. And a beautiful place: “Kirman Lake, California.” There is not a hint that the fish came from the lake, but it’s on my ‘mysteries to decipher’ list.

I clicked on every page and every photo. It didn’t hurt in the least. My eyes finally let me know that I had crept closer to the monitor than was sane or healthy.

Damn the report; just one more click.

graham-steelhead.jpg

Is Fly Fishing Sexist – You Bet!

POORLY POTTY TRAINED PISCATOR
PONDERS WEE WILLIE’S PROBLEMS !

Visit the site of the contemplative angler for poor perturbations on plumbing. May the mark IV push Pablum into your puttees, and may your piscalator petrify your William. Shame on you!

baby_piss.jpg

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